Wednesday, February 13, 2019

Pitfalls of Protocols: Pushing the Limits of Extubation

A recent post described extubating an asthmatic patient with very bad weaning parameters, and I promised to provide a followup telling whether he "flew" or not.

He flew.

It was a nail-biting experience and for the first hour it was unclear if he was going to make it.  His respiratory rate settled down into the teens which was reassuring, but he did not gain lucidity for quite a while and was intermittently midly "combative" and uncooperative.  He was on HFNC with oxygen saturations in the high 80s and low 90s, and he remained tachycardic and was wheezing.  His wife and the nurse were continuously in the room reassuring him, as were several doctors during the first hour or two.  During the course of several hours, he was able to be weaned to simple face mask and then nasal cannula and the next day he was discharged from the ICU.

If we had followed some sort of "weaning protocol" with blind faith, I don't know how long it would have been before he would have "passed" the protocol's tests and been extubated.  At some point, somebody would have said, "Hey, we better stray here, or we'll never get him extubated."

Friday, January 25, 2019

Limits of the Possible: Clinical Reasoning of a Harrowing Extubation

"The only way of discovering the limits of the possible is to venture a little way past them into the impossible."  -  Clark's Second Law


In prior posts here and on the Medical Evidence Blog (here, here, here, and here), I have outlined my position that the only way you can really know if a patient can breathe on their own is to let them try - a "trial of extubation".  Prediction equations get you published, but their signal to noise ratio is often poor and ignored, to patients' peril.  Indeed the reason I'm obsessed with extubation is because I think being intubated unnecessarily is one of the worst things a patient can endure, and the best thing I can do as an intensivist is identify the earliest moment when a patient can breathe on his own and extubate him.

I faced a very harrowing extubation decision recently, and I admitted to the medical students that it was the most nail-biting of my career.  But I think analyzing it, both before and after the fact can be very instructive.